Posts Tagged ‘big bang’

LOOKING ALL THE WAY BACK IN TIME

July 31, 2017

If you look back in time, (up in the night sky, at the light emitted from galaxies billions of years ago), you are actually looking at an earlier version of the universe when it was smaller.

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Due to the nature of how light moves through space, when you look back 14 billion years to the farthest reaches of the universe, you are actually looking at a very small volume. But the image, warped as it is, is spread out and fills the farthest regions of the sky, like a view through a concave lens. If you were able to look all the way back to the tiny point of the Big Bang, the image would be smeared and spread out across the 14 billion light-year shell, any detail of the event washed out by turning the fine detail of a tiny event into a picture the size of the universe.

So, when you look up at the night sky, everywhere you look in the blackness of deep space, 14 billion light years away, is actually the same small point.

Does this make sense? I’m trying to think of a good analogy for this, but it just isn’t coming to me. Maybe like starting with a tiny drawing on the surface of a tiny sheet of rubber, then stretching it out so that the sheet of rubber stretches all around you in a sphere, like the inside of a balloon, and then trying to figure out what the original picture looked like.

This, of course, begs the question of what physicists are calculating when they measure the accelerating expansion of the universe. If the universe was physically smaller 14 billion years ago, and now the remaining image of it is spread out over a sphere with a radius of 14 billion light years, that’s going to come off as an acceleration; the farther you look, the smaller the original volume and the more the image is spread out over the apparent warped view of the current volume. And, of course, 14 billion years ago, the universe actually was expanding a lot faster than it is now. It’s a double-whammy of accelerations. Most physicists are a hell of a lot smarter than me, so I’m guessing that both these accelerations have been calculated into the “accelerating expansion of the universe” equation. I can only speculate that there is a third element. I wish I could find out without wading through a lot of really obscure math.

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Mass-creation From the Vacuum – Heisenberg Meets the 3-body Problem

March 27, 2010

I’ve been considering the conundrum of Mass-Energy conservation and the violation of this principle in light of the Big Bang. One of my friends described this as the “elephant in the room” with regard to the law of mass-energy conservation.

So we have to wonder if there are any existing mechanics that allow violation of this law. The first one that pops to mind is the Heisenberg time-energy relationship that allows virtual particles to pop into existence from the vacuum; the shorter the time, the greater the potential mass-energy. Sadly, the brief existence is confined to a duration so short that it’s impossible to detect, although certain effects, such as the Casimir effect, strongly suggest that virtual particle interactions are quite real (look it up on Wikipedia, if you’re curious).

Now put two of these virtual particle pair-productions adjacent to each other when they pop into existence (this has to happen some tiny fraction of the time) and the 4 particles produced are suddenly involved with the chaotic 4-body problem, interacting in such a way as to acquire stability before disappearing from our universe, potentially creating any variety of subatomic particles and pairs, half matter and half antimatter.

The net result is a continuous mass-creation with high-energy particles appearing from nowhere.

Your initial response will be, “Yes, but the antiparticles are going to combine with regular particles and annihilate a mass equal to that created.” Absolutely true. However, the energy produced will not be dragged back down into the closed-loop non-existence of a virtual particle. It will be released as two high-energy photons that go zipping around the universe and adding to the overall mass-energy of the universe, adding its little contribution to the light-pressure factor of its expansion.

Perhaps Fred Hoyle’s discounted steady-state universe still has a viable solution, and perhaps if we go back in time toward a Big Bang, we will find out that this mechanism decreases the mass of the universe so that there is no Big Bang at all, just a slow and continuous chaotic production of mass energy from the vacuum.

Perhaps it starting not with a bang, but a whisper (apologies to T.S. Eliot).